1999: Containers

When Paul Stewart graduated in 1999 with a first class degree in Agriculture, Economics and Management he went out as a volunteer to Tanzania in East Africa to help a small charity to set up a dairy to pasteurise milk. On an errand to the local hospital in Tabora he saw the need for extra medical equipment and supplies. On his return home for Christmas the Rev. Ronnie McCracken and some friends helped him source and send a 40 ft container to Ketite Hospital

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1999: Containers

When Paul Stewart graduated in 1999 with a first class degree in Agriculture, Economics and Management he went out as a volunteer to Tanzania in East Africa to help a small charity to set up a dairy to pasteurise milk. On an errand to the local hospital in Tabora he saw the need for extra medical equipment and supplies. On his return home for Christmas the Rev. Ronnie McCracken and some friends helped him source and send a 40 ft container to Ketite Hospital

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2001: The Beginning

In 2001 Amara Aid was founded as we realised here in Northern Ireland that we could help eliminate some of the need in Tabora, Tanzania. Amara Aid became a registered charity in November 2001.

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2001: The Beginning

In 2001 Amara Aid was founded as we realised here in Northern Ireland that we could help eliminate some of the need in Tabora, Tanzania. Amara Aid became a registered charity in November 2001.

2002: Bible School

A local Canon in the Anglican church was trying to set up a Bible School to enable young people from distant villages to be taught the scriptures and be resident for either a 3 month or 6 month course. Amara Aid sponsored many of these young people who would return to their local villages and teach others God's word.

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2002: Bible School

A local Canon in the Anglican church was trying to set up a Bible School to enable young people from distant villages to be taught the scriptures and be resident for either a 3 month or 6 month course. Amara Aid sponsored many of these young people who would return to their local villages and teach others God's word.

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2004: St. Philip's Girls Hostel

Many christian girls were coming into Tabora town from outlying villages either for education or to work and it was realised that some of the accommodation was not suitable for them. The Anglican church agreed to renovate old unused buildings for a girls hostel. Giles Roberts was the architect assigned to this project, he and his wife were living in Tabora at the time. The accommodation was for 20 young girls and was filled immediately. Amara supported this project financially.

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2004: St. Philip's Girls Hostel

Many christian girls were coming into Tabora town from outlying villages either for education or to work and it was realised that some of the accommodation was not suitable for them. The Anglican church agreed to renovate old unused buildings for a girls hostel. Giles Roberts was the architect assigned to this project, he and his wife were living in Tabora at the time. The accommodation was for 20 young girls and was filled immediately. Amara supported this project financially.

2006: Water Tanks

In 2006 Amara was asked to support a water tank project in Tharaka, Kenya. It was being developed by Norman and Pauline Kennedy who were missionaries from Northern Ireland. This project consisted of building a cement base close to the brick houses, which has recently been built. A plastic tank was then erected on it and the rain water gathered in November and March from the corrugated iron roofs filled the tanks and would stay safe for drinking for 6 months.

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2006: Water Tanks

In 2006 Amara was asked to support a water tank project in Tharaka, Kenya. It was being developed by Norman and Pauline Kennedy who were missionaries from Northern Ireland. This project consisted of building a cement base close to the brick houses, which has recently been built. A plastic tank was then erected on it and the rain water gathered in November and March from the corrugated iron roofs filled the tanks and would stay safe for drinking for 6 months.

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2007: Street Children Project

On Paul's arrival in Arusha, Tanzania a few years later he was asked to buy bread for some street children. Cautious about giving money he asked for the children to be brought to a café in the town where he would buy them a meal. When Paul arrived 14 children were waiting for him. After the meal they began to tell their individual stories some of which were disturbing. They agreed to stay together as a little group for safety and on Paul's birthday he arranged for a meal at his own house for the children, 23 turned up and so this project increased until there were over 90. Eventually a small hostel was built to accommodate 20 of them and Amara Aid directors agreed to sponsor some of the others to go to boarding school.

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2007: Street Children Project

On Paul's arrival in Arusha, Tanzania a few years later he was asked to buy bread for some street children. Cautious about giving money he asked for the children to be brought to a café in the town where he would buy them a meal. When Paul arrived 14 children were waiting for him. After the meal they began to tell their individual stories some of which were disturbing. They agreed to stay together as a little group for safety and on Paul's birthday he arranged for a meal at his own house for the children, 23 turned up and so this project increased until there were over 90. Eventually a small hostel was built to accommodate 20 of them and Amara Aid directors agreed to sponsor some of the others to go to boarding school.

2008: Familia Moja Home Made Bricks

The ingenuity of the African people never ceases to amaze us. The positivity, sense of community and hard work ethic would put a lot of us to shame. Familia Moja's latest project involves building their own homes, outhouses etc from scratch. Literally making each individual brick used in the projects.

Amara Aid | Building with Familia Moja
Amara Aid | Familia Moja Water Storage Tank Project

2008: Familia Moja Water Project

Storing water is vital to keeping up supplies for small villages and families. Familia Moja has been working on installing water tanks which keep the water away from any light as the sun light can spoil water.

2011: Heifer & Goat Project

In a small rural village called Machame on the slopes of Mt. Kilimanjaro a farming community requested some animals to help them make a living and be able to send their children to school. Amara Aid was able to help over 50 families by financing heifers and goats. The project consisted of each farmer passing on the first offspring to others in the community.

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2011 Heifer & Goat Project

In a small rural village called Machame on the slopes of Mt. Kilimanjaro a farming community requested some animals to help them make a living and be able to send their children to school. Amara Aid was able to help over 50 families by financing heifers and goats. The project consisted of each farmer passing on the first offspring to others in the community.

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2012: Rwandan Cows Project

In 2012 we were able to sponsor the purchase of 2 heifers and provide suitable shelter for them at the Hope for the Future home in Rwanda. It was set up by a Rwandan national who was born in exile during the genocide there.  He set up a home there to house young boys who lived on the street. Paul was able to visit them and see the need for some heifers as they try to support themselves and extend their small farm.

2014: Ashura Medical Centre

The Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at ALMC is dedicated to providing care for critically ill premature and term babies. Free and subsidised care is provided to babies in the NICU. At present, the ALMC NICU provides the highest level of care available for critically-ill babies in Tanzania and is among the most advanced NICUs in all of East Africa. In 2017 we had our smallest survivor ever, baby Gracious, weighing only 670 grams (1 pound – 7 ounces) on arrival. This beautiful little girl was born 14 weeks premature, and along with her twin brother was discharged home after 2 months in the NICU. Both are doing extremely well! 

Amara Aid | Ashura Medical Centre
Amara Aid | St. Philips Farm

2016: St. Philip's Farm

Life at the Medical Clinic in Tabora is hectic on a day to day basis. Not only do they have patients from the district but many are contacted through the Travelling Clinic which covers 4 villages many miles from Tabora. Dr. Ruth Hulser writes “ Thank you for your generous donation to the Clinic. We are using the money to help children with Pneumonia survival and also to purchase the Finecare machine etc.

2016: St. Philip's Clinic

Life at the Medical Clinic in Tabora is hectic on a day to day basis. Not only do they have patients from the district but many are contacted through the Travelling Clinic which covers 4 villages many miles from Tabora. Dr. Ruth Hulser writes “ Thank you for your generous donation to the Clinic. We are using the money to help children with Pneumonia survival and also to purchase the Finecare machine etc.

Amara Aid | St. Philips Medical Centre
Amara Aid |Underground Water Storage Tanks

2016: Underground Water Storage

Many areas of Africa are experiencing drought conditions at the moment and Arusha and Tabora in Tanzania are no different. Digging a well and constructing an underground reservoir is under way. The project is being undertaken by St. Phillip’s Clinic and managed by Dr Ruth. In the Kenya project we used plastic tanks for water storage but the updated design in Tanzania will use cement underground wells with the rain water being collected from the roofs.

This has been an on-going project in “Tharaka”, Kenya and has been very successful.  Rainwater will stay fresh for up to 6 months to be used for cooking, drinking and washing. If crops fail and animals die there will be a tragic tale in the coming months.  AMARA Aid has committed finance towards elevating hunger and urge our supporters and friends to help us in this urgent task

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2012: Rwandan Cows Project

In 2012 we were able to sponsor the purchase of 2 heifers and provide suitable shelter for them at the Hope for the Future home in Rwanda. It was set up by a Rwandan national who was born in exile during the genocide there.  He set up a home there to house young boys who lived on the street. Paul was able to visit them and see the need for some heifers as they try to support themselves and extend their small farm.

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2016 - Present

We've been working on education, health and farming projects in Tanzania. Check out our latest work here: Current Projects